All posts filed under: mindfulness

How Christians can meditate without leaving the Church

If you’re a Christian or former or lapsed Christian, have you ever wondered whether meditating was possible without using practices from other religions or traditions?

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How to practice empathy in relationships and at work: 6 ways

In the holiday season, and in general, it would be great to figure out how to see the world from another person’s perspective. This can help us become aware of the situations of others, which in turn can help us practice generosity. In situations with our families, romantic partners, or even work colleagues, how can we practice empathy?

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Gratitude: A Practical Guide to Manning Up (Part 1)

“Chin up!” “Move on!” “Let it go!” Often when guys express a sense of loss or sadness, the response from friends and loved ones is frighteningly simplistic. We’re frequently advised to do something we’ve been told our entire lives on the football field or rugby pitch: “Suck it up!” As men, we’re often expected to keep our emotions suppressed and carry the burdens of our daily lives in silence.

Even more troubling, the idea of suppressing our grieving process and discounting our need to examine is often suggested by people whose opinions and advice we respect. It’s not for lack of trying; our confidants and guides often want to see us restored to our former glory — so not dignifying the complexities of our feelings seems a natural solution…

For me, the path to happiness (or at least temporary sanity) comes from the concept of gratitude…

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How to embrace anger and not repress it: insights from poetry

Do you handle your anger, or does it handle you?

We need to skillfully deal with anger when it arises, lest it derail our better intentions and lead to hurtful words and actions to those around us.

We get angry for legitimate reasons. A plan didn’t turn out as we’d hoped. We feel hurt by someone’s actions or words.

But that doesn’t mean the best response is to lash out while we feel ablaze with fury. Doing so usually pushes people away – intimated or scared by our fiery side – or escalates a confrontation instead of allowing us to negotiate productively.

How can we engage with anger, instead of treating it like a feared tornado that rages into our psyche without warning, razing our best-laid intentions?